WILDs – ‘Waking-Induced Lucid Dreaming’ – A Complete beginners Guide – Part 2/9: Ways to Relax

WILDs – ‘Waking-Induced Lucid Dreaming’ – A Complete beginners Guide – Part 2/9: Ways to Relax


[Music] Hiya, in this tutorial we’re going to
examine a couple of good ways to relax the body, just enough to begin seeing
these hypnagogia that start to appear behind our closed eyes once we’ve become relaxed enough. A ready state of relaxation that everyone already
experiences every single time to go to bed as the body quite naturally relaxes
in preparation to then falling asleep. Please understand that we’ve already
spent an entire lifetime perfecting this ability to very easily fall asleep.
Something many children often initially struggle with until they learn like,
everyone else, to somehow just let it happen when they feel that sensation of
tiredness sweeping over them. As the body then relaxes and approaches sleep,
changing patterns of light and then images quite naturally begin to appear
behind our closed eyes. Under normal circumstances we don’t really pay much
attention to all this and consider it to be just our rambling thoughts and the
images that accompany them that we’re perceiving, and the next thing you know
we’ve been pulled off into sleep and dreaming anyway and didn’t even notice
it happening! So then, this idea of deliberately relaxing the body and then
looking for the hypnagogia that appear actually just follows the natural course
we all pass-through every night on our way into unconscious sleep.
In which case, what we’re going to do is to ‘imitate’ this process of falling
asleep just enough to begin seeing the hypnagogia, and then instead of being
pulled into the dream state unconsciously, we’re going to more
deliberately and consciously ‘let’ ourselves be pulled into it in the
full waking awareness of it doing so. The result of this is a fully waking lucid dream
instead of an ordinary unconscious one. The down-time one more usually
experiences by just falling asleep, then spent lucidly dreaming instead of
unconsciously snoring. The body naturally relaxes anyway as its preparing to go
to sleep, but now we’re going to give it a hand by deliberately making it happen
instead of allowing it to do so all by itself. This deliberate act on our part of
‘kick-starting’ the process then giving us an edge when it comes to also resisting
our polished routine of entering into sleep unconsciously. Now then, there are many ways of
achieving a suitable state of relaxation. You may already know some and be using
them fairly regularly anyway. If so, that’s just fine as this will definitely
save you time later when becoming familiar with using a state of
relaxation as a springboard into a WILD. Okay, so this is where the fun really
begins, better sit down and strap-in. Since for our current purposes I’ll be
concentrating on just one or two quite simple, but effective, methods of getting
oneself sufficiently relaxed to invoke our hidden, innate ability, to hop-off into a
waking dream state at will. Both methods are rather similar. For the first I suggest
getting yourself into bed and lying down on your left side, with
your knees together and your legs slightly bent. Give your body a little
time to adjust to the exertion involved of getting into bed and settling down
into a comfortable position. Just lie there for a few minutes in the dark
until your breathing and heart rate gradually slow down to a nice steady
rhythm. After about five minutes, when your breathing has settled right down and
has become steady and regular, deliberately take a long, deep breath by
slowly breathing-in through your nose until no more air can get in.
Don’t force anything or ‘cork’ your throat by letting-go and relaxing your
chest once fully inflated. Keep your throat held open and hold that breath
for about four or five seconds or so, and then let it out again very slowly
through the mouth, while at the same time trying to feel any residual tension in
your muscles draining out of your body and sinking down through the bed and
into the floor. Make a conscious attempt as you breathe out to feel your whole
body becoming even more relaxed than it was before, as though it was sinking down
into the bed. Aim via these breaths to let your body become so relaxed that if
anyone were at one point to lift one of your arms and let it go again,
the arm would just flop right back to where it was under its own weight
without any help from you. Do this long breath just the once and then let your
body return to breathing again under its own steam for a few moments breathing
normally, just letting your body breathe as it may, and then, after a little while,
deliberately take another long slow breath in through your nose, feeling your
whole body tense up slightly as you control the intake of air, letting your
lungs fill up as much as they can without forcing anything, again holding
that breath when it reaches the top by maintaining the ever so slight pressure of
breathing-in for another count of four or five seconds before slowly letting
that breath out through your mouth, while at the same time deliberately letting go
of your body as though you were weightless.
when all the air is naturally out (again without forcing anything) let your body return to its usual way of breathing for a couple of minutes or so, noting how much
more your body feels relaxed each time. Repeat this exercise several times over
the course of the next few minutes and you’ll probably be surprised at just how
tense you actually were, even though your body felt completely relaxed before. A
good example of this is around the head, neck and shoulders area which seem to
sink ever-deeper than before into the pillow each time we do the long breath
out. Try to detect any residual muscle
tension from your body sink down into the bed and floor as a mild sensation
similar to that of going down in an elevator. Pay particular attention to
these areas of the head, neck and shoulders, working through them in
sequence is necessary until they all feel completely relaxed and as sunken
into your pillow is there likely to get. Keep this up for about 10 to 20 minutes
in total, alternating between normal breathing and the occasional long
controlled one, and/or until you experience a sensation of feeling like
a complete dead weight, trying each time to aim for that feeling of being so
relaxed that if someone were to lift your arm and let it go again it would
just flop back to your side. You may also feel at this point a very
slight overall tingling sensation, a kind of spreading numbness in your limbs, and
also notice that your breathing is now beginning to be composed of slow far
slighter breaths coming more from the lower part of your abdomen (Belly Breaths)
This is perfect. Don’t try to force this situation to
come about, let it occur naturally through using your breathing to release
muscle tension. This is precisely the easy state of mental and physical
relaxation one is aiming for in order to begin trying to lucid dream, and this
feeling of bodily lightness, or largeness, coupled with belly breaths, confirms it!
The second method consists of doing exactly the same breathing exercises for
a few moments to get started, but this time systematically working all the way
up from your toes to the top of your head, gradually releasing all bodily
tension from each area down through the bed and into the ground as you go. Again
spending at least 15 to 20 minutes or so on this, the time it takes to reach a
state of relaxation gradually becoming shorter with each session and as your
ability to relax at will progresses. Don’t worry if it takes longer in the
initial stages, you are learning to ‘consciously’ relax your body and it takes
a little practice! You may have to try for 40-minutes the first few times to
reach and recognize this state of being, but rest-assured you’ll quickly get it
all down to under 20 minutes or so with familiarity and practice.
In the meantime just enjoy it for what it is: the setting out upon a new
adventure. Don’t rush things, enjoy every part and stage of it. In order later to reach a
state of lucid dreaming, it’s also very important during these relaxation
exercises not to move or change your body position or posture at all,
particularly during the last few minutes of doing them. During the first few minutes get yourself into a comfortable enough position and try to maintain it ,and to
also perfect that position by tweaking it minutely here and there until you
don’t need to settle down or move anymore. After that don’t even move an
inch! The end result of relaxing without moving like this is eventually to
achieve a mild sensation of floating, or of the body having slightly expanded in
some way. At this point the hands will sometimes possibly feel kind of puffy or
enlarged. Other times it’s as though one can no longer tell the exact proportion
or size of Bodily areas you happen to focus on.
All these minor sensations are perfectly normal,
they’re a novelty, enjoy them and explore them for what they are. They are nothing
to worry about and are really only ‘clues’ the body provides us with to let us know
that we’re nearly ready now to enter into a lucid dreaming state. Practicing
this every night for about a week should be enough to have mastered this first
stage, any strange or odd bodily sensations being a clear clue that one
is ready now to move on to the second stage of looking and watching-out for
those hypnagogia! Thank you for watching! I hope you found this instruction
intriguing and inspiring and would like to learn more. In which case please
subscribe to this channel and/or check back soon for the next video update in
this series. Anyway, bye for now, plus see you soon in part 3: ‘Hypnagogia, the key to WILDs! See ya! [Music]

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